A new Gilda Greco Mystery, guest post, #Giveaway: Too Many Women in the Room by Joanne Guidoccio

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When Gilda Greco invites her closest friends to a VIP dinner, she plans to share David Korba’s signature dishes and launch their joint venture—Xenia, an innovative Greek restaurant near Sudbury, Ontario.

Unknown to Gilda, David has also invited Michael Taylor, a lecherous photographer who has throughout the past three decades managed to annoy all the women in the room. One woman follows Michael to a deserted field for his midnight run and stabs him in the jugular.

Gilda’s life is awash with complications as she wrestles with a certain detective’s commitment issues and growing doubts about her risky investment in Xenia. Frustrated, Gilda launches her own investigation and uncovers decades-old secrets and resentments that have festered until they explode into untimely death. Can Gilda outwit a killer bent on killing again?

 

 


All About Tag Lines

At a recent meet-up, I was surprised to learn that many of the writers in the room (myself included) didn’t know the difference between a log line and a tag line. I had always assumed the two terms could be used interchangeably. While both terms originated in the film industry, the two concepts have very different structures and functions.

A log line provides the main conflict, main character, and the stakes in a well-constructed sentence that is usually less than 25 words in length.

A tag line is a catch phrase that sets the tone. It sums up the entire plot in one compelling phrase or sentence that is at most 10 words in length.

In my research, I discovered that several synonyms exist for taglines, among them tags (United States), end lines or straplines in the United Kingdom, payoffs in Italy, and baselines in Belgium, and signatures in France.

Here are sample tag lines from the film industry:

One ring to rule them all.        Lord of the Rings

Don’t go into the water.         Jaws

The list is life.                          Schindler’s List

Not every gift is a blessing.    The Sixth Sense

The Toys are back in town.     Toy Story 2

Collide with destiny.              Titanic

There can be only one.            Highlander

Whoever wins…We lose.        Alien Vs. Predator

While these tag lines evoke interest and emotion, they provide few specifics about the individual movies. Instead, puns and clever wording set the appropriate tone and succeed in hooking potential moviegoers.

In the same way, a tag line for a novel needs to tantalize prospective readers with a minimum of well-chosen words and images. Less is definitely more when it comes to taglines.

Here’s the tag line for Too Many Women in the Room:

8 women → 8 motives to kill.

Any memorable tag lines to share?


About The Author

In 2008, Joanne took advantage of early retirement and decided to launch a second career that would tap into her creative side and utilize her well-honed organizational skills. Slowly, a writing practice emerged. Her articles and book reviews were published in newspapers, magazines, and online. When she tried her hand at fiction, she made reinvention a recurring theme in her novels and short stories. A member of Crime Writers of Canada, Sisters in Crime, and Romance Writers of America, Joanne writes cozy mysteries, paranormal romance, and inspirational literature from her home base of Guelph, Ontario.

Where to find Joanne…

 

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