As the Christmas Cookie Crumbles (A Food Lovers’ Village Mystery): Interview with Author Leslie Budewitz

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Erin is one smart cookie, but can she keep the holiday spirit—and herself—alive till Christmas?

In Jewel Bay, all is merry and bright. At Murphy’s Mercantile, AKA the Merc, manager Erin Murphy is ringing in the holiday season with food, drink, and a new friend: Merrily Thornton. A local girl gone wrong, Merrily has turned her life around. But her parents have publicly shunned her, and they nurse a bitterness that chills Erin.

When Merrily goes missing and her boss discovers he’s been robbed, fingers point to Merrily—until she’s found dead, a string of lights around her neck. The clues and danger snowball from there. Can Erin nab the killer—and keep herself in one piece—in time for a special Christmas Eve?

Includes delicious recipes!


Leslie, thanks for stopping by Island Confidential! Can you tell us about your protagonist, Erin?

Erin Murphy runs the Merc, a local foods shop in her family’s hundred-year-old grocery in the heart of the village of Jewel Bay, Montana. She’s half Italian, as you can tell by her name, and deeply committed to the village, local business, her friends and family, and justice. Like a lot of Montana kids, she left the state for a few years, then returned. It still surprises her to realize that while she was gone, her hometown changed. But then, so did she.

In AS THE CHRISTMAS COOKIE CRUMBLES, Erin meets another woman returning to her hometown after years away and feels an instant connection. She’s determined to forge a friendship, despite what some locals, and the woman’s own parents, say about her. She’s busy at the Merc, village headquarters for holiday food and gifts. And she’s getting married on Christmas Eve.

What could go wrong?

How much alike are you and Erin?

Like Erin, I grew up in Montana, left, and returned. I’m enjoying exploring that theme, a common one, through the experiences of a younger woman. Like her, I’m obsessed with food and enjoy cooking and entertaining. Erin shares my habit of spouting odd lines of poetry or from a play, my love of cats and cookies, and my commitment to my community. Although her mother Fresca and I aren’t much alike, I suspect that if I met Erin, she would feel like a daughter to me.

Do your characters change and evolve throughout consecutive books in the series?

Oh, definitely! That’s part of their appeal to me as a writer, and I hope, part of their appeal to the reader.

Have you ever thought of killing someone that you know in real life–on the pages of a murder mystery, I mean?

I’ve thought of it, but never done it because if I disliked someone that much, I wouldn’t want to spend six months and 300 pages with them!

How realistic is your setting? Do you take liberties, or are you true to life?

The village of Jewel Bay, Montana is closely based on the town where I live, though I’ve changed the street names and most of the businesses. A few are simply too cozy, too iconic, to mess with, so I’ve kept them alive, with the owners’ permission—Red’s Bar, the Playhouse, and the Jewel Inn would all be easy to identify if you strolled the streets with me. There’s a touch of wish fulfillment in my fictional town—a lovely green belt we lack around the bay, which we do have, a library and community center we hope to get soon, and a bakery I’m glad doesn’t exist because I would drop in far too often!

When the movie or TV series is made, who plays the major parts?

Honestly, I don’t know! I don’t use actors as models for my story people, and couldn’t begin to cast the finished project! Occasionally, I picture someone I know when I start creating a character, but they evolve so much as the story unfolds that no one would ever recognize them on the page.

What’s the worst and best advice you’ve heard or received as an author?

It’s actually the same piece of advice: Do whatever works. It’s the best because it gives a writer permission to find her own way, and the worst because it can give her an excuse to stay stuck in a rut. Writers are often told they must write every day. When I started, I was practicing law full-time, sometimes more. I just didn’t have the brain power to write every day, so I wrote on Fridays and Saturday mornings—and finished three manuscripts that way. But when my work schedule changed, I chose to develop new writing habits and now I do write nearly every day. I’ve always been a planner, but when I couldn’t see the middle of a book in advance, despite knowing the ending, I let myself start anyway, trusting that I would discover what happened in those chapters along the way. Following a radically different process was terrifying, but for that book, it worked. And now, because I’ve been willing to explore other processes, other options, I’ve got more writerly tools in my box.

Thank you for letting me introduce myself to your readers. It is such a gift to be trusted with someone’s most valuable assets: their time and attention. I am grateful to be able to explore the world through storytelling—and it’s the readers who make that possible.


About The Author  

Leslie Budewitz is the author of the Food Lovers’ Village Mysteries and the Spice Shop Mysteries—and the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction. She lives in northwest Montana with her husband, a musician, and doctor of natural medicine, and their cat Ruff, a cover model, and avid bird-watcher.

Connect with her on her website, http://www.LeslieBudewitz.com, on Facebook, or on Twitter.

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New from Ellen Byron: A Cajun Christmas Killing

>>>Enter to Win a hardcover copy of A Cajun Christmas Killing (plus swag)<<<

Maggie Crozat is back home in bayou country during the most magical time of the year. In Pelican, Louisiana, Christmastime is a season of giant bonfires on the levee, zydeco carols, and pots of gumbo. Except, this year, the Grinch has come to stay at the family-run Crozat Plantation B&B. When he floods travel websites with vicious reviews, Maggie thinks she’s identified him as rival businessman Donald Baxter. That is, until he’s found stabbed to death at Maggie’s workplace. And Maggie and her loved ones become top suspects.

The Crozats quickly establish alibis, but Maggie’s boyfriend, Detective Bo Durand, remains under suspicion. With Bo sidelined during the investigation, Maggie finds herself forced to work with an unlikely ally: longtime family enemy Rufus Durand. Her sleuthing uncovers more suspects than drummers drumming, and lands her in the crosshairs of the murderer.

The sleigh bells are jingling, and the clock is ticking for Maggie and Rufus, who must catch the killer or it will be the opposite of a Joyeux Noël in A Cajun Christmas Killing, the recipe-stuffed third installment of USA Today bestselling author Ellen Byron’s Cajun Country mysteries.

 


Interview with Innkeeper and amateur sleuth Maggie Crozat

Maggie, welcome to Island Confidential! Can you tell our readers a little bit about yourself?

Maggie Crozat: I’m an artist, but I help out at my family’s Louisiana plantation-turned-B&B. I also have a part-time job working at another plantation, one my mother’s family owned but donated to the state. I have to – I mean, get to – wear one of those fake antebellum ball gowns. Honestly? Not my style. I’m a jeans and t-shirt kinda gal.

I’m 5’4” and have hazel eyes, but I’ve always wanted to be 5’7” and have one blue and one green eye. I’m an artist and I have a fantasy of seeing the world blue through the blue eye and green through the green eye. Does that sound crazy? Yeah, it sounds crazy. But I don’t care, it’s true!

Who’s the character you get along with the best?

I’m very close to my parents and have fantastic friends, but I’d have to say I get along best with my grand-mere. She’s smart and has a great sense of humor, and only plays the Southern grand dame card when she has to. But when she plays it, Katie, bar the door. That’s something she would say. I also have an extremely hot boyfriend. Like, “what’s he doing with me and not a super model?” hot. Just thought I’d mention that.

Which character do you have a conflict with?

Oh, that’s easy. Rufus Durand. His family’s hated mine for 150 years, ever since my great-great-great-grandmother dumped his great-great-great-grandfather for cheating on her during their engagement. But there’s been a thaw in our relationship. Stay tuned! (Translation: read book three, A CAJUN CHRISTMAS KILLING.)

Just between you and me: What do you really think of your author, Ellen Byron?

She’s very bossy – always telling me what to do. And I think she’s mean for not making me 5’7” and not giving me one green and one blue eye. And for stuffing me into those wretched antebellum ball gowns. Do you know what it’s like suffering through Louisiana’s legendary humidity wearing twenty yards of polyester? Hashtag brutal!

What’s next for you?

I love Christmas in Cajun Country. They build these giant bonfires all along the levees near my hometown of Pelican, Louisiana, and light them on Christmas Eve to guide Papa Noel to the houses of Cajun children. But those bonfires can be dangereux, especially if a murderer is on the loose. You can read about how one of those psychopaths almost got me in the previously mentioned  A Cajun Christmas Killing. After putting me through that, my author better get me something nice for Christmas. Like one blue and one green eye.


About The Author  

Body on the Bayou, the second in Ellen’s Cajun Country Mystery series, won the Left Coast Crime Lefty Award for Best Humorous Mystery, and was nominated for a Best Contemporary Novel Agatha Award. Her debut book in the series, Plantation Shuddersmade the USA Today Bestsellers list, and was nominated for Agatha, Lefty, and Daphne awards. Ellen is also a recipient of a William F. Deeck-Malice Domestic Grant from the Malice Domestic Convention. Her TV credits include Wings, Still Standing, and Just Shoot Me, as well as network and cable pilots. As a journalist, she’s written over 200 magazine articles for national publications. Her plays, published by Dramatists Play Service, include the popular Graceland and Asleep on the Wind. A native New Yorker and graduate of Tulane University, Ellen lives in the Los Angeles area with her husband, daughter, and the family’s spoiled rescue dogs.

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New First in Series: A Christmas Peril (A Theater Cop Mystery)

>>> Enter to win a print copy (U.S. only) <<<When Edwina “Sully” Sullivan’s life imploded, she left behind her job on the police force and her unfaithful husband to start a new life as the general manager of her hometown theater, the Cliffside Theater Company. For five years, she focused on budgets instead of crimes and kept the Cliffside running alongside its mercurial artistic director.
But when her best friend is arrested for killing his father, the rich and powerful Peter Whitehall, no one is looking for another suspect. So, in between keeping A Christmas Carol on budget and Scrooge sober, Sully dusts off her investigative skills to find a killer. Her two lives collide when her ex-husband gets on the suspect list and she’s forced to confront her past in order to save her present.


About the Author

J. A. Hennrikus is the author of the Theater Cop Mystery series. As Julianne Holmes, she writes the Agatha-nominated Clock Shop Mystery series for Berkley Prime Crime. Hennrikus blogs with the Wicked Cozy Authors, is on the board of Sisters in Crime, and is a member of Mystery Writers of America. She is also an arts administrator who lives in Massachusetts. Visit her online at www.JHAuthors.com.

Webpage – https://jahennrikus.com/

Wicked Cozy Authors Blog – https://wickedcozyauthors.com/ 

She tweets under @JulieHennrikus, and am on Pinterest and Instagram, and has a page on Facebook. She also blogs on Live to Write/Write to Live, and  Killer Characters.


 

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New Sewing Cozy: Better Off Thread

Santa finds himself in a stitch of trouble in the tenth in the series from the national bestselling author of The Stitching Hour…

better-off-thread

Marcy is busy helping her customers make hand-crafted ornaments at her embroidery shop, the Seven-Year Stitch. But despite the yuletide bustle, when her friend Captain Moe asks for her help, she can’t refuse—especially when the favor is to play the elf to his Santa for sick children at a local hospital. Despite the ridiculous outfit, Marcy finds herself enjoying spreading cheer—until the hospital’s administrator is found murdered.

Although the deceased had plenty of people willing to fill her stocking with coal, evidence pins the crime on Moe. Now it’s up to Marcy, with the help of her police officer boyfriend Ted and her Irish Wolfhound Angus, to stitch together the clues to clear Moe’s name—before someone else winds up crossed off Santa’s list for good…


Gayle Trent (and pseudonym Amanda Lee) writes the Daphne Martin Cake Decorating series and the Embroidery Mystery series. The cake decorating series features a heroine who is starting her life over in Southwest Virginia after a nasty divorce. The Embroidery Mystery series features a heroine who recently moved to the Oregon coast to open an embroidery specialty shop. She also writes the Down South Café Mysteries as Gayle Leeson. 

gayle

Author Links:

Webpage – http://www.gayleleeson.com

Gayle Trent Webpage – http://www.gayletrent.com

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/GayleTrentandAmandaLee/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/GayleTrent

GoodReads – https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/426208.Gayle_Trent

Purchase Links

Amazon – Barnes & Noble – Books-a-Million – Kobo  


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A new Italian Kitchen cozy mystery: The Seven Course Christmas Killer by Rosie Genova

Culinary mystery author Rosie Genova has a new novella out just in time for Christmas!On Christmas Eve, someone might be sleeping with the fishes. . .

the-seven-course-christmas-killer-high-res

Rosie Genova, author of the Italian Kitchen Mysteries, serves up a new dish this week with the release of her e-book holiday novella, The Seven Course Christmas Killer: A Holiday Novella from the Italian Kitchen, only 99 cents!

The story takes place on Christmas Eve, as Vic and the gang prepare the traditional Feast of the Seven Fishes for their annual holiday party. But before you can say “shrimp scampi,” Mayor Anne McCrae takes a nasty fall that may not be an accident. Add a nosy reporter, guests with grudges, and a missing kitchen knife—and Vic suddenly has all the ingredients for murder.

Italian Kitchen

The Italian Kitchen Mysteries by Rosie Genova

It’s December at the Casa Lido, which means only one thing: the Rienzi family’s traditional Christmas Eve celebration, including wine, song, and seven Italian seafood courses. As Victoria and Tim prep scungilli and calamari, Nonna directs the cooking until all is in readiness for the big night.
But the holiday cheer is interrupted by the attempted murder of Mayor Anne McCrae, who asks Vic to investigate. Trouble is, there are as many suspects as there are fishes on the Christmas Eve menu . . .


About the author


A Jersey girl born and bred, national bestselling author Rosie Genova left her heart at the shore, which serves as the setting for her cozy series, the Italian Kitchen Mysteries. Her debut, Murder and Marinara, was voted a Best Cozy of 2013 by Suspense Magazine and was a finalist for a 2014 Daphne Award. Her books have been described as blending “mystery with comedy, romance, family drama, a vivid and affectionate portrayal of the Jersey shore and…oh yes, cooking.”

The proud mama of three grown sons, Rosie still lives in her home state with her husband and a charming mutt named Lucy. She also writes women’s fiction as Rosemary DiBattista.

Shop for the Italian Kitchen Mysteries

 


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The Type of Presents That Bring The Most Happiness

Material purchases can bring as much happiness as experiential ones, but in time-release form. 


 

The finding is fascinating because until now studies have suggested that experiential purchases are superior.

Experiential purchases include things like holidays, concert tickets or visits to a spa.

Material purchases, though, can provide just as much pleasure in the long-run, the new research suggests.

For the study, people were asked to keep track of their levels of happiness five times a day over two weeks.

The study compared the effects of material purchases, like portable speakers and coffee makers, with experiential purchases, like tickets to a hockey game or a weekend ski trip.

The results showed that experiential purchases provided short intense bursts of pleasure which tended to fade away.

In contrast, material purchases brought repeated smaller doses of happiness over the weeks.

However, when people looked back at their purchases six weeks later, it was the experiences that gave them more satisfaction.

So, perhaps experiences still have the edge.

Mr Aaron Weidman, the study’s first author, said:

“The decision of whether to buy a material thing or a life experience may therefore boil down to what kind of happiness one desires.

Consider a holiday shopper deciding between tickets to a concert or a new couch in the living room.

The concert will provide an intense thrill for one spectacular night, but then it will end, and will no longer provide momentary happiness, aside from being a happy memory.

In contrast, the new couch will never provide a thrilling moment to match the concert, but will keep the owner snug and comfortable each day throughout the winter months.”

The study was published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science (Weidman & Dunn, 2015).

»  Read on PsyBlog

 


Still Looking for a last-minute gift? How about  THE CASE OF THE DEFUNCT ADJUNCT ?

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THE SILENCE OF THE CHIHUAHUAS

Pepe, aspiring P.I. Geri Sullivan’s muy clever Chihuahua, has stopped talking. But why now, with Geri’s best friend Brad missing and her ditzy sister in grave danger? Geri’s lost without Pepe’s dogged detective work, especially when a client of Brad’s expires under very murky circumstances.

Luckily, Pepe turns out to be an excelente blogger, and his nose for clues soon has the detective duo chasing down leads. But they’ll have to put a bite on crime quickly, because danger’s afoot – and it’s making tracks in their direction . . .




Waverly Curtis is the joint pseudonym for mystery writing team Waverly Fitzgerald and Curtis Colbert.

Curt

Curt Colbert is the author of the Jake Rossiter and Miss Jenkins mysteries, a series of hardboiled, private detective novels set in 1940’s Seattle. The first book, Rat City, was nominated for a Shamus Award in 2001. A Seattle native, Curt is also a poet and an avid history buff. He is the editor of Seattle Noir, a collection of crime stories published in 2009. He was a judge for the Edgars in 2008 and is a member of the Mystery Writers of America. Curt and his wife, Stephanie, live in a Seattle suburb under the thrall of their cat, Esmeralda.

Waverly

Waverly Fitzgerald is the author of three historical romances set in Victorian London under the name of Nancy Fitzgerald. Ever since her first novel was published in 1981, she has been teaching writing classes for adults at various venues including the UCLA Writers Program, the University of Washington Extension, and regional conferences.  She currently teaches at and works for Richard Hugo House, the literary arts center in Seattle. Waverly also writes non-fiction, and has published a book called Slow Time: Recovering theNatural Rhythms of Life. She lives in an apartment in the heart of Seattle with her daughter, Shaw, and Shaw’s Chihuahua, Pepe.

Waverly and Curt met in a writing class in the late 1980s and have been working together ever since. Curt took Waverly’s novel writing class while he was writing his first novel. Waverly was his writing coach while he wrote his trio of historical mysteries set in Seattle. For about a year, they worked on twin novels in which Waverly’s protagonist, a female P.I. appeared as a sidekick in Curt’s novel about a hard-boiled Vietnam vet and vice versa. When Curt came up with the idea of a mystery featuring a talking Chihuahuanamed Pepe, Waverly asked if she could help and the collaboration began.


Pepe is an eight-year old Chihuahua, adopted by Waverly’s daughter Shaw when he was a puppy. He likes stuffed toys, especially if they  squeak. He hatesthe rain, which is unfortunate since he lives in Seattle. Like his namesake character, he hates being dressed up and thinks he is much bigger than he is. Unlike his namesake, he has a sweet disposition and doesn’t talk much, but he does have his own Facebook page.

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 Quieres a good campus murder mystery? Get THE CASE OF THE DEFUNCT ADJUNCT

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3.99 .99 introductory price 
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Preorder now for 99 cents: The Case of the Defunct Adjunct

A forbidden kiss. A death in plain sight. And the faculty meeting’s just begun.

Forced to attend the Student Retention Office’s summer retreat, Professor Molly Barda brings her game of buzzword bingo to fend off boredom. But when the lecherous Kent Lovely, Mahina State’s one-man hostile work environment, collapses face-first into his haupia cheesecake, the afternoon goes from dull to disastrous. Now Molly has to fight to keep an innocent out of prison—and herself off the unemployment line.

The Case of the Defunct Adjunct is the spoiler-free prequel to the Molly Barda mysteries, a cozy mystery series set in remote Mahina, Hawaii. If you like Dorothy Parker, Sarah Caudwell, P.G. Wodehouse, or E.F. Benson’s Mapp and Lucia stories, you’ll enjoy this tale of passion, pilferage, and petty politics. Preorder it now, and start reading on December 1.

 


To celebrate, I’m giving away signed copies of The Musubi Murder and The Case of the Defunct Adjunct, along with a USA-made Bayside brand Mahina State University t-shirt in M, L, or XL.  Enter today!


In memory of Joyce Lavene: Author interview and giveaway, A Dickens of a Murder

Christmas at Canterville!

Lisa Wellman and Simon Canterville are surprised to find a dead man on their roof in the midst of rushing to open the Canterville Book Shop in time for the holidays. And not just any dead man – Ebenezer Hart – the man who opposed the book shop opening in Olde Town, Portsmouth, Virginia.
What might be more surprising is when Daniel Fairhaven – Lisa’s ex – turns up at the door of the three-story Victorian house to head the police investigation. She hasn’t seen him in years but the sparks start to fly as soon as they are in the same room together.

Simon and Lisa are obviously the best suspects for the murder. Each of them had something to gain by Hart’s death. Then an attempt on Simon’s life throws that theory into a tailspin.
But the biggest surprise yet comes when the ghost of Charles Dickens turns up to help Lisa with the murder investigation – and writing the mystery novel she has been working on for years.
Without a doubt, Daniel and Dickens in Lisa’s life means trouble. And there’s still the matter of trying to get the book shop open with a killer on their heels.




Joyce and Jim stopped by to chat about their first Canterville Book Shop mystery, A Dickens of a Murder.

Q: Can you tell us what the book is about? How did you come up with the idea?

A: A librarian/mystery writer moves into a haunted house to become a partner in a book shop.
That was our original idea. But filled in a little more it reads like this:

Lisa Wellman and Simon Canterville are surprised to find a dead man on their roof in the midst of rushing to open the Canterville Book Shop in time for the holidays. And not just any dead man – Ebenezer Hart – the man who opposed the book shop opening in Olde Town, Portsmouth, Virginia.

I’m not sure how we came up with the idea. We were in Olde Town doing some research and looking at the old houses there and we thought, wouldn’t that house make a great book shop? And what if it was haunted? And what if the owner’s name was Simon Canterville, like in the Canterville Ghost (one of our favorite stories) and the woman who was helping him was also an ex-librarian (because she’d know so much about books) and a mystery writer? I guess that was it.

Q: Tell us about Charles Dickens; why did he pick Portsmouth, VA, to manifest himself, and what does he think of it?

A: We think he chose Portsmouth because he’s from Portsmouth, England. But it could be the affinity the house has with books, which we will be exploring in the future when other writers pay a call on Simon and Lisa. We think he likes it, from what he can see from the house anyway. It reminds him of a place he might have lived in.

Q: How does your collaboration work? Does one person outline and the other fill in? Do you take turns writing chapters? Each person has one hand on the keyboard? How do you do this?

A: We have our computers networked together – which means we can see each other’s screens as we write. Jim used to work as a network admin at Bank of America. After we have our synopsis sorted out so we both know what each of us has in mind, we sit down to write, telling each other the story across the desk as we type it in until we have a rough draft.

For instance – I might say, “She goes outside and the car is there.” And Jim says, “The car can’t be there because he took it last night, remember.” And I say, “Really? I don’t remember that. Are you sure?” And he says, “It doesn’t matter. There’s a bus.” And so on.

Q: What kind of research did you do? Did it involve food at all?

A: Absolutely no food was involved in the researching of this book. It isn’t a culinary mystery. There is tea and coffee and a few daily meals but nothing foodie. We researched Charles Dickens, Portsmouth, VA, ghosts, starting a bookstore, and French dueling pistols.

Q: Are there characters with whom you particularly identify?

A: Joyce: I like Lisa. She lost her mother earlier in the year and is facing her first Christmas without her. She’s propelled herself into this new venture and quit her job as a librarian as a direct result of her mother’s death. It seems like something I might have done.
Jim: I like Simon Canterville. He’s very eclectic and knows what he wants. Also he’s kind of rich. I like that in a man.

Q: You’ve published over seventy novels and hundreds of articles. What is your secret to being so productive? Can you give us one or two tips?

A: Definitely one of our secrets is having two people. The only thing we do together is actually writing the book. We split up for promo, web work, formatting, everything else. That is a huge labor saver. Jim is in charge of mailing off the books and stuff that I give away in contests. You get the idea. Imagine if someone could always be there to do half of your work. You’d get more done too.

Q: What’s next?

A: Glad you asked. Our favorite question! In December the first book in our Christmas Tree Valley Mysteries, Murder Fir Christmas, will be out. It is set in the world of our Sweet Pepper Fire Brigade Mysteries (writing as J.J. Cook) and our protagonist is a wildlife officer.

Also in December is the third book in our Biscuit Bowl mysteries, Fat Tuesday Fricassee.
In January is the fourth book in our Sweet Pepper Fire Brigade mysteries, Sweet Pepper Hero.
Thanks for having us here!

 


Dickens Photo

Joyce Lavene passed away Tuesday, October 20, 2015 at her home. She was 61. Joyce and Jim were married 44 years, and since 1999 they’ve written award-winning, bestselling mystery fiction as themselves, J.J. Cook, and Ellie Grant. Their collaboration resulted in more than 70 novels for Harlequin, Berkley, Amazon, and Gallery Books along with hundreds of non-fiction articles for national and regional publications. Jim and the rest of the family appreciate your prayers and positive thoughts.

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The Adventures of Alice Mongoose and Alistair Rat scheduled for a special reissue in 2015

The adventures of Alice Mongoose and her best friend, the gentle and dapper Alistair Rat, will be coming out later this year in e-book format. Stay tuned! #TwoLittleHousesinaCaneField #Friendship

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Alice Mongoose and Alistair Rat

Alice Mongoose and Alistair Rat are back! A new generation of children in Hawaii and beyond will be able to enjoy  the gentle humor, practical life lessons, and charming illustrations of Mary Pfaff, known in her day as “the Beatrix Potter of Hawaii.”

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