New Country Store Mystery by Maddie Day with Character Interview: Biscuits and Slashed Browns

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Enter to win a print copy of Biscuits


For country-store owner Robbie Jordan, the National Maple Syrup Festival is a sweet escape from late-winter in South Lick, Indiana—until murder saps the life out of the celebration . . .As Robbie arranges a breakfast-themed cook-off at Pans ‘N Pancakes, visitors pour into Brown County for the annual maple extravaganza. Unfortunately, that includes Professor Connolly, a know-it-all academic from Boston who makes enemies everywhere he goes—and this time, bad manners prove deadly. Soon after clashing with several scientists at a maple tree panel, the professor is found dead outside a sugar shack, stabbed to death by a local restaurateur’s knife. When an innocent woman gets dragged into the investigation and a biologist mysteriously disappears, Robbie drops her winning maple biscuits to search for answers. But can she help police crack the case before another victim is caught in a sticky situation with a killer?


Character Interview: Robbie Jordan

Robbie, welcome to Island Confidential. Can you tell our readers something about yourself? 
First let me thank you for giving me this opportunity to chat here! Well, I’m Robbie Jordan and I’m pleased to meet you all. I’m in my late twenties, and the owner and head chef at Pans ‘N Pancakes, my country store restaurant. Did you know I am a California girl? I’ve lived in southern Indiana for almost five years now, but I confess to missing the beaches of Santa Barbara and the smell of orange blossoms in the air in the winter. On the other hand, I’ve made a home for myself in small town South Lick and my country store has become a community gathering place, which was my dream for it.

Who’s your favorite other character in Biscuits and Slashed Browns? 
I love hanging out with my Aunt Adele. She’s over seventy and going strong. She’s opinionated, competent, and caring. She lives on her sheep farm, but was formerly the mayor of South Lick and the fire chief before that. And can she ever bake bread!

Anyone you don’t get along with so well?
I’ve had my share of conflicts with state police detective Oscar Thompson. He doesn’t like the fact that sometimes I’ve figured out who the murderer is before he has. He’s good at his job but isn’t much of a people person. But we’re starting to work out our differences.

Just between you and me: What do you really think of your author?
Maddie/Edith? She loves writing fiction, I’ll say that much for her. She’s at her desk writing by seven in the morning six days a week. She’s a pretty good cook, too, and loves gardening in the summer. She’d never be able to keep up with me on a bicycle, though – she says she doesn’t like riding uphill.

Robbie, what’s next for you?
I’m excited to be finishing my new bed and breakfast rooms upstairs, and that my father and his wife will be visiting from Italy in June! They’ll be my first guests, and my author says you can read about what happens in Death Over Easy, which will be out in late July.


About The Author

Maddie Day is a talented amateur chef and holds a PhD in linguistics from Indiana University. An Agatha Award-nominated author, she is a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America and also writes award-winning short crime fiction. She lives with her beau and three cats in Massachusetts.

As Edith Maxwell, she write the Local Foods Mysteries (Kensington Publishing) and the Quaker Midwife Mysteries (Midnight Ink).

You can find all Maddie’s/Edith’s identities at http://www.edithmaxwell.com. She blogs every week day with the other Wicked Cozy Authors at wickedcozyauthors.com. Look for her as Edith M. Maxwell and Maddie Day on Facebook and @edithmaxwell and @maddiedayauthor on Twitter.

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New Quaker Midwife Mystery and Research Guest Post: Called to Justice by Edith Maxwell

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Praise for Delivering the Truth
by Edith Maxwell (Book 1 in this series)

Ms. Maxwell weaves a sturdy cloth from the stories of the various characters in Delivering the Truth.
~Back Porchervations

I enjoyed every minute of this book…
~Shelley’s Book Case

This was a very entertaining read. I really enjoy reading Edith Maxwell’s writing as it flows so well.
~Melina’s Book Blog

…a different type of historical cozy…I enjoyed reading a book where the protagonist is a midwife and of the Quaker faith…
~Storeybook Reviews

Rose is a smart character and the history of the story is done well.
~A Chick Who Reads

The author takes us into Rose’s life, making us feel as though we are right there with her in every situation. The mystery is well-developed and leaves the reader guessing right to the end.
~Book Babble

Quaker midwife Rose Carroll is enjoying the 1888 Independence Day evening fireworks with her beau when a teenaged Quaker mill girl is found shot dead. After a former slave and fellow Quaker is accused of the murder, Rose delves into the crime, convinced of the man’s innocence. An ill-mannered mill manager, an Irish immigrant, and the victim’s young boyfriend come under suspicion even as Rose’s future with her handsome doctor suitor becomes unsure. Rose continues to deliver babies and listen to secrets, finally figuring out one criminal – only to be threatened by the murderer, with three lives at stake. Can she rescue herself, a baby, and her elderly midwifery teacher in time?


Runabout, Phaeton, Brougham, Rockaway?

 I had the great fortune to go riding in a carriage last summer with a woman who really knows her stuff.  I’m always looking to improve the details in my late nineteenth-century Quaker Midwife Mysteries, and Susan Koso is one way to do it.

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She owns a mare named Hope. She owns a number of horse-drawn vehicles that my midwife Rose Carroll might very well have ridden in. She knows what kind of bridles and tack were used in 1888. And she’s written academic published papers on the roads, the carriage industry, and the economics of the late 1800s. How could I go wrong?

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I first met Susan at a couple of years ago at an Amesbury Carriage Museum event, where this not-young woman showed herself to be more agile and flexible than me, crawling around helping to secure carriages the museum was moving down from a second-floor loft.

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In late June when the flies and mosquitoes were all hatched and bothersome, I drove to our riding appointment a few town’s south of here, and I met her horse, Hope. Hope’s crocheted ear guard is similar to those horses would have worn to keep the bugs out of their ears and eyes. Susan hitched Hope to a beautiful restored runabout (an open two-seater conveyance with four wheels pulled by one horse), handed me a helmet, and off we went.

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We wandered around Essex County Greenbelt Association trails, rode all through Appleton Farm (which used to be my walking route when I lived in that town), and moseyed back, talking all the way. I got to experience Hope trotting, I hung on for dear life on bumpy trails and around corners, and I generally soaked up the atmosphere.

On a couple of trails, Susan said, “This would have looked exactly the same in Rose Carrols’s day.” I had to agree!
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As when I went riding the year before, I wore my long linen skirt and low boots to get a small feel for the clothing of the day.
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I never stopped picking Susan’s considerable brain. I learned more about all the different kinds of vehicles: phaetons, broughams, traps, and Rockaways, among others. She said the dash board in front of our knees – named to prevent hooves from dashing mud up onto passengers and drivers – might have been covered in patent leather. She told me a horse pushes a carriage rather than pulls it (which I still don’t quite get). I even heard about the “fifth wheel” – but that one’s going to need further study before I use it in a book.

She suggested a couple of convenient ways for a malicious villain (oh, I guess that’s redundant) to do away with someone by cutting almost through an important strap or to cause a horse to be a runaway. This is a woman after my own heart. Susan had also finished reading Delivering the Truth, and kindly pointed out a couple of small errors in horse-and-carriage procedure. I thanked her, of course. And then she read the manuscript for Called to Justice within a couple of days’ time and corrected me on several points in that book, too.

I’m so delighted and grateful to have found a subject matter expert willing to share her extensive knowledge with me. Guess who’s getting a complimentary copy of each book in the series as long as it runs?


About The Author  


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New Country Store Cozy and #Giveaway: When the Grits Hit the Fan by Maddie Day

>>>Win a print copy of When the Grits Hit the Fan<<<

Despite the bitter winter in South Lick, Indiana, business is still hot at Robbie Jordan’s restaurant. But when another murder rattles the small town, can Robbie defrost the motives of a cold-blooded killer?when-grits-hit-the-fan

Before she started hosting dinners for Indiana University’s Sociology Department at Pans ‘N Pancakes, Robbie never imagined scholarly meetings could be so hostile. It’s all due to Professor Charles Stilton, who seems to thrive on heated exchanges with his peers and underlings, and tensions flare one night after he disrespects Robbie’s friend, graduate student Lou. So when Robbie and Lou go snowshoeing the next morning and find the contentious academic frozen under ice, police suspect Lou might have killed him after their public tiff. To prove her friend’s innocence, Robbie is absorbing local gossip about Professor Stilton’s past and developing her own thesis on the homicide—even if that means stirring up terrible danger for herself along the way . . .


About The Author

Maddie Day is a talented amateur chef and holds a PhD in linguistics from Indiana University. An Agatha Award-nominated author, she is a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America and also writes award-winning short crime fiction. She lives with her beau and three cats in Massachusetts.

As Edith Maxwell, she write the Local Foods Mysteries (Kensington Publishing) and the Quaker Midwife Mysteries (Midnight Ink).

You can find all Maddie’s/Edith’s identities at http://www.edithmaxwell.com. She blogs every week day with the other Wicked Cozy Authors at wickedcozyauthors.com. Look for her as Edith M. Maxwell and Maddie Day on Facebook and @edithmaxwell and @maddiedayauthor on Twitter.

Buy on Amazon | Buy on B&N


Sign up for Frankie’s newsletter and get a free Professor Molly story

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