‘Ulysses’ VR Game Developed in Boston, Showcased in Ireland

A virtual reality game developed by college students in Boston and based on James Joyce’s “Ulysses” is being showcased in Dublin as the Irish capital holds its annual celebration of the author and novel.

Read more at the NYT:  http://nyti.ms/2ss3Yrq


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New Mystery Series set in Ireland: Dial P for Poison. (Yes, there is a nun.)

Movies. Muffins. Murder.

Maggie Doyle moved to Ireland to escape her cheating ex and crumbling career in the San Francisco PD. When the most hated woman on Whisper Island is poisoned at her aunt’s Movie Theater Café, Maggie and her rock-hard muffins are hurled into the investigation.

With the help of her UFO-enthusiast friend, a nun, and a feral puppy, Maggie is determined to clear her aunt’s name. Can she catch the murderer before they strike again? Or will her terrible baking skills burn down the café first?

Cozy, quirky, and fun, this tongue-in-cheek mystery is a delicious introduction to the Movie Club Mysteries Series. Grab a cocktail and join Maggie as she takes her detective skills across the pond in Dial P For Poison.


Maggie, thanks for stopping by Island Confidential! Can you tell our readers a little bit about yourself?

MD: My name is Maggie Doyle. I grew up in San Francisco, and followed my parents’ footsteps by joining the SFPD. My mom’s a fifth generation American, but my dad was born in Ireland. I spent many childhood summers on Whisper Island, the remote Irish island where he grew up. I loved the different pace of life, the gorgeous landscape, and my Irish aunts, uncle, and cousins. When my life fell apart last year, I jumped at the chance to help my aunt, Noreen, run her café. I’d always liked the old movie theater in Smuggler’s Cove and I was thrilled to learn that Noreen had renovated it into a café with a small movie theater attached.

Something readers might not guess about me is that the reason I didn’t go back to Whisper Island for eleven years had nothing to do with my Irish ex-boyfriend breaking up with me. It hurt to feel so at home in a place I knew I could never live. My parents and brothers are all in the SFPD, and I felt pressured to follow their example. From day one, life as a police officer wasn’t the right fit for me. I have a natural nose for detection, and a desire to help people, but I hated the bureaucracy and the politics. I don’t like taking orders, and I talked back to people I shouldn’t have. I was never going to rise up the ranks like the rest of my family, as my mother constantly reminds me. I’m a lot happier doing my own thing on Whisper Island.

Who’s the character you get along with the best?

MD: Among my friends and family on Whisper Island, I can confide in my cousin, Julie. She’s a good listener, and she doesn’t pry. I also get along well with my friend, Lenny, but our relationship is more based on fun than on sharing confidences. Although I have a hunch that Lenny might need my help soon…
Q: Which other character do you have a conflict with? Why?
Police Sergeant O’Shea. He’s lazy, incompetent, and blinded by wealth and social status. He reminds me of a guy who was my superior in the SFPD, and not in a good way.

Just between you and me: What do you really think of your author, Zara?

MD: I think we’d get along if we met in real life, once she got over her shyness. I might need to loosen her up with one of my signature Peppermint Cream cocktails!

What’s next for you?

MD: I’ve decided to stay on Whisper Island for a few months. I’ll continue to help out at the Movie Theater Café, but I’m planning on some rest and relaxation. After all, how much murder and mayhem can happen on one small island?


About The Author

USA Today bestselling author Zara Keane grew up in Dublin, Ireland, but spent her summers in a small town very similar to Ballybeg, the fictitious town in which she sets her Irish contemporary romances.

She currently lives in Switzerland with her family. When she’s not writing or wrestling small people, she drinks far too much coffee, and tries (with occasional success) to resist the siren call of Swiss chocolate.

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Spotlight: Murder in an Irish Village by Carlene O’Connor

“If Janet Evanovich and Maeve Binchy wrote a book together, Murder in an Irish Village would be the result. The Irish setting rings with authenticity and Siobhan O’Sullivan is a character to savor. She’s funny, feisty, and fearless. I want her to be my new best friend. I also want another book by Carlene O’Connor to read. This one is delicious fun.”—Laurien Berenson, author of Live and Let Growl


In the small village of Kilbane, County Cork, Ireland, Natalie’s Bistro has always been a warm and welcoming spot to visit with neighbors, enjoy some brown bread and tea, and get the local gossip. Nowadays twenty-two-year-old Siobhán O’Sullivan runs the family bistro named for her mother, along with her five siblings, after the death of their parents in a car crash almost a year ago.

It’s been a rough year for the O’Sullivans, but it’s about to get rougher. One morning, as they’re opening the bistro, they discover a man seated at a table, dressed in a suit as if for his own funeral, a pair of hot pink barber scissors protruding from his chest.

With the local garda suspecting the O’Sullivans, and their business in danger of being shunned–murder tends to spoil the appetite–it’s up to feisty redheaded Siobhán to solve the crime and save her beloved brood.

ADVANCE PRAISE FOR CARLENE O’CONNOR AND MURDER IN AN IRISH VILLAGE

“A smart whodunnit in an idyllic locale. I dare you not to be charmed by sleuth Siobhan and her siblings, the O’Sullivan Six.”—Barbara Ross, author of Musseled Out

“A delightful, funny, fast-paced romp of a book. O’Connor has written a vivid evocation of life in a small Irish town, an evocation replete with sharp characterizations and dialogue real enough to make you believe you’re sitting in an Irish pub. A satisfying read that will keep you entertained from the first to the last page.”Isis Crawford, author of A Catered Tea Party

“The cheeky and close-knit repartee among the O’Sullivans…[and] their antics are sure to appeal to cozy fans, who will also appreciate the warmth and spirit of the people of Kilbane.”– Publishers Weekly

“The first in this new series set in an Irish village delivers charm, warmth, and a smartly plotted mystery. Sprinkled with Irish words and phrases, the dialogue is authentic. The plot unfolds nicely, with several layers linking the current crime to an earlier accident. Siobhan is strong-willed and tenacious, while also being likable and funny. A winning debut.”– RT Book Reviews, 4 Stars



About The Author  

Carlene O’Connor comes from a long line of Irish storytellers, or professional liars as she prefers to call herself. Her great grandmother emigrated from Ireland to America during The Troubles, and the stories have been flowing ever since. She has dual citizenship and divides her time between New York and the Emerald Isle. Of all the places across the pond she’s wandered, she fell most in love with a walled town in County Limerick and was inspired by the town to create Kilbane, County Cork.

 

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Looking for more small town mystery? get THE CASE OF THE DEFUNCT ADJUNCT

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Today I’m on The Drunken Druid’s Thursday Interview

No.1 Would you break the law to save a loved one? 

…and that’s not even the strangest question, just the first one.

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Thursday Interview: Frankie Bow.

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